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Thu 30th May – Dr Chris Fuller – See It/Shoot It: The Secret History of the CIA’s Lethal Drone Program

Tue 11th June – Ariane Sherine – Talk yourself better

Thu 27th June – Cerys Bradley – A unifying theory of gay

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Wednesday June 12th

Skeptics of the Round Table at Bishop on the Bridge in Winchester from 7pm, for some informal Skeptical chat, food, drinks
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March 28th – Gareth Williams – Unravelling the Double Helix

Prof Gareth Williams

DNA. The double helix – the blueprint of life, and during the early 1950s, a baffling enigma that could win a Nobel Prize.

Everyone knows that James Watson and Francis Crick discovered the double helix.

In fact, they clicked into place the last piece of a huge jigsaw puzzle that other researchers had assembled over decades. Researchers like Maurice Wilkins (the ‘Third Man of DNA’) and Rosalind Franklin, famously demonised by Watson. Not forgetting the ‘lost heroes’ who fought to prove that DNA is the stuff of genes, only to be airbrushed out of history.

In his book, and in this talk, Unravelling the Double Helix, Professor Gareth Williams sets the record straight. He tells the story of DNA in the round, from its discovery in pus-soaked bandages in 1868 to the aftermath of Watson’s best-seller The Double Helix a century later. You don’t need to be a scientist to enjoy this book. It’s a page-turner that unfolds like a detective story, with suspense, false leads and treachery, and a fabulous cast of noble heroes and back-stabbing villains. But beware: some of the science is dreadful, and the heroes and villains may not be the ones you expect.

Gareth Williams is Emeritus Professor and former Dean of Medicine at The University of Bristol. His previous books for general readers are Angel of Death: The Story of Smallpox (shortlisted for the Wellcome Book Prize of 2010), Paralysed with Fear: The Story of Polio and A Monstrous Commotion: The Mysteries of Loch Ness. He is a past president of the Anglo-French Medical Society and has an honorary doctorate from the University of Angers. He is often to be found playing the flute or saxophone in and around Bristol.

For this talk we ask for a £3 donation (at the door) that doubles as a raffle ticket to win a book prize to cover speaker expenses and the cost of the venue.

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